From the Heart of a Lion on Parshas Toldos

November 19, 2014
The first one came out red with a full coat of hair, and they called him Eisav. Afterwards, his brother came out clutching the heel of Eisav,and he was called Yaakov. Yitzchak was sixty years old when they were born.FromtheHeartofaLion9789655241969

When parents have the privilege to name a child there is much contemplation and consideration prior to the decision. The name of a person captures one’s essence and depth and therefore requires wisdom and deliberation. The Midrash explains that even the Angels were unable to name the animals and man. Adam Harishon, with insight and intelligence, was able to name the animals, himself and even Hashem. Naming is a talent gifted to man together with the help of divine influence from above. Many times when asking Tzaddikim for advice concerning my own children, I was told to make sure to call my children by their complete name. The name of a person captures one’s strengths and character traits and by hearing it reminds a person of one’s abilities.

With these thoughts on the beauty and depth of a Jewish name, we will analyze the naming of our third Patriarch at the beginning of our Parsha. The Torah explains that Yaakov is given his name because he was born holding onto the eikev, heel, of his brother Eisav. This momentary occurrence seems like a superficial reason behind a name for life. What is the essence of Yaakov that was being captured by this name? According to one opinion in Rashi 3 this name was decided by Hashem himself. This knowledge requires even deeper explanation as a divinely determined name must have hidden meaning on a very deep level. Another important question arises as to why there is a letter yud added before the word eikev? Shouldn’t Yaakov have just been called eikev? Although now that may sound strange, it is only because we are not accustomed to that name. The name of Eisav also seems to be altered. Rashi 4 explains that the name Eisav represents the fact that he emerged as a finished product. This is clear from the pasuk as his body was full of hair. The Shem Mishmuel explains that this was the essence of the negative character of Eisav. He always considered himself a finished product, not needing to work on himself or grow. This was the foundation that led him to his ways of wickedness. Just as Yaakov seems to have an added yud, Eisav is missing one from his end. The word for an object being finished would be Assui including a yud at the end. Where did this yud disappear to?
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