Rabbi Shear Yashuv Cohen: Between War and Peace

November 26, 2017

Daniel D. Stuhlman, AJL Reviews

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“Rabbi Eliyahu Yosef Shear Yashuv Cohen (1927-2016) had his feet in more than one world. He fought in the battle for Jerusalem in the 1948-49 war and was taken prisoner to Jordan when the Old City fell, hence the subtitle “Between War and Peace.” One chapter is his diary from the battle and his captivity. After the war, he was appointed chief chaplain of the Air Force. His brother-in-law Rabbi Shlomo Goren was the chief chaplain of the army. In 1953, he married Naomi Goldstein the daughter of Rabbi Herbert Goldstein of New York and grand-daughter of Harry Fischel.

As chief rabbi of the Israel Air Force and of the city of Haifa he had frequent meetings with Jews of many levels of observance and with Arabs and Christians. He even went to Rome to meet the Pope and address the synod of the Catholic Church. He was respected by religious leaders, heads of state, public figures and his own community in Haifa and Jerusalem.

This is an interesting book that introduces Rabbi Shear Yashuv Cohen to a new audience even though he died less than 2 years ago. The book is highly recommended for academic, synagogue, school, and personal collections.

Frisch, Yechiel & Yedidya HaCohen. Rabbi Shear Yashuv Cohen: Between War and Peace. Translated by Irene Lancaster. Jerusalem; New York: Urim Publications, 2017. 334 pp. (9789655243539).

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Black Friday/Cyber Monday Deals at Kobo

November 23, 2017

The following eBooks are on sale at Kobo from Thursday, November 23rd through Tuesday, November 28th:

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BOOK REVIEW: JEWISH GUIDE TO PRACTICAL MEDICAL DECISION-MAKING

November 20, 2017

Reviewed by Devorah Talia Gordon • 

Medical Decisions web 1

When asked to review Rabbi Jason Weiner’s book, Jewish Guide to Practical Decision-Making, I hesitated. Surely my editor had asked the wrong writer. Having almost no medical or halachic knowledge, I imagined the read would be akin to Read the rest of this entry »


15% off Urim Publications at Mintzer Bookstore in Gush Etzion

November 19, 2017

 

Display at Minzer

Urim Publications display table at Mintzer Bookstore

 

Mintzer Bookstore in Gush Etzion is currently running a 15%-off sale on all Urim titles.

Efrat, Te’ena Commercial Center

02-993-3490

Sun-Thurs: 08:30-19:00, Fri: 8:30-13:00

 

 


Who Gets To Judge The Converts?

November 13, 2017

by Gedalyah Reback • Scribe (Forward), November 8, 2017

Jewish Law for Converts

 

“The law “ואהבתם את הגר,” and you shall love the convert, is mentioned over 36 times in the Torah. The prolific rabbi Moshe Feinstein wrote that “As a matter of normative practice, one should know that the mitzvah (commandment) to love the convert obligates us to bring them closer and to be lenient on all these matters [of Jewish law].”

Yet for more than a decade Read the rest of this entry »


Difficulty Revising Historical Attitudes About Gender Equality

November 12, 2017
By AARON HOWARD | Jewish Herald Voice • Thu, Nov 09, 2017
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“For the observant Jew, the Torah is the eternal word of G-d. If one wishes to build a life based on Torah and Halakha, one can go on two paths. One path is the conviction, in the words of Rabbis Ethan Tucker and Michael Rosenberg that “the eternal word of G-d must speak to our contemporary challenges.” This path embodies the idea that Halakha is ever expanding.

Read the rest of this entry »


When Converts Are Commodities

October 29, 2017

Written by Harold Berman for Scribe (Forward), on October 26, 2017.

Jewish Law for Converts

“If my Facebook feed is any guide, converts to Judaism are commodities, not human beings. In countless posts, and in real life too, born Jews of all stripes opine about — depending on their ideological outlook — whether particular converts have met proper conversion standards, or whether there should be any standards at all. Not surprisingly, their views tend to be a Rorschach test of sorts. They are each comfortable with a set of requirements that produce converts who practice Judaism just like they do.

Orthodox Jews argue with each other about which aspects of halacha a conversion candidate must agree to and abide by if their conversion is to be accepted. Not coincidentally, Modern Orthodox and Charedi Jews each advocate for conversion standards that look suspiciously like a mirror image of how their respective communities practice Judaism, more so than what Jewish sources actually say about conversion. On the liberal end of the spectrum, Read the rest of this entry »