Black Friday/Cyber Monday Deals at Kobo

November 23, 2017

The following eBooks are on sale at Kobo from Thursday, November 23rd through Tuesday, November 28th:

The Jewish Dog9780983868538 Kaytek the Wizard Milton aftertheholocustthebellsstillring9789655241624 Biblical View of Man 9789657108963.JPG kosher movies web2 JewishSocialJusticeWeb2 Book of Psalms 9657108861  Jewish Woman Next Door 9789657108956.jpgOne Baby Step at a Time 9789655240016 RereadingIsraelWeb1 AbuseWeb1

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15% off Urim Publications at Mintzer Bookstore in Gush Etzion

November 19, 2017

 

Display at Minzer

Urim Publications display table at Mintzer Bookstore

 

Mintzer Bookstore in Gush Etzion is currently running a 15%-off sale on all Urim titles.

Efrat, Te’ena Commercial Center

02-993-3490

Sun-Thurs: 08:30-19:00, Fri: 8:30-13:00

 

 


Interview with Brian Hull of the Kaytek the Wizard Puppet Show

February 13, 2017

“Kaytek the Wizard” Puppet Show at the Gracie Theatre

By Alexander Downing

Wishing Chair Productions and puppet designer, is bringing his puppet play “Kaytek the Wizard,” based on Janusz Korczak’s book, to the Gracie Theatre for two performances Friday February 10th.

The story revolves around Kaytek, a mischievous schoolboy who wants to become a wizard and is surprised to discover that he’s able to perform magic spells and change reality. He begins to lead a double life: a powerful wizard in the dress of an ordinary boy.

Shows are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. As a community service, Husson University is offering tickets to the 11 a.m. show for only $2.

The 11 am performance is free to all Husson students, staff, faculty, and members of their families.

Tickets for the 7 p.m. show are currently on sale from $10.00-$15.00. To reserve tickets, call the Gracie Theatre box office at 207.941.7888 or visit www.gracietheatre.com. Group rates are also available for the 7 p.m. evening show.

Check out the interview here.

 


Sneak Peek: Kaytek the Wizard Puppet Show

November 8, 2016

Check out the cool behind the scenes images of Brian Hull’s production of Janusz Korczak’s magical story!

Script and Direction by Brian Hull

Music by Sarah Hart

For more information, visit www.brianimations.com


Review of The Jewish Dog

March 15, 2016

by Jeff Fleischer, Foreword Reviews

The Jewish Dog9780983868538Kravitz’s canine narrator describes the events around him without understanding their full impact, offering a new perspective on the Holocaust.

With The Jewish Dog, Asher Kravitz succeeds in the difficult task of finding a new approach to a Holocaust story by telling the tale through the first-person perspective of a family pet. Kravitz treats the material with the appropriate respect while using the dog’s changes in ownership as a clever way to flesh out history and provide an additional perspective.

The story opens with the dog, Caleb, introducing himself and explaining his circumstances, as one of several puppies born in the household of a Jewish family in 1935 Germany. Kravitz drops in hints about what’s on the horizon, whether through Hitler’s voice on the radio or another dog owner bragging about his pet’s pure breeding,

Because of the real-life Nazi decree that banned Jews from owning dogs, the family has to give up Caleb, handing him over to a German with a fondness for the animal. Caleb eventually passes through several owners, who range from kind to cruel, including some involved in the worst crimes of the Nazi era. At various points in his journey, the dog is on the run with a pack of strays, being molded into a prison guard by Nazi trainers, or taking part in a prisoner uprising. At times, Caleb, whose name changes throughout his ordeal, even takes part in atrocities, following the orders of new masters. In doing so, he offers a window into the soldiers or citizens who committed similar crimes, without excusing their behavior. He is haunted by an incident when he was a puppy, when he stood by while a fellow dog hunted and killed a harmless kitten, and thinks about that experience whenever he fails to do right.

Kravitz has some fun with the dog’s food-driven motivation, and the humor does not undermine the story’s tragedy. Because Caleb’s circumstances change so often, the story maintains its suspense, as it’s never obvious which parts of history the dog will experience directly.

This review originally appeared on Foreword Reviews.


Review of The Jewish Dog

August 27, 2015

By Barbara M. BibelThe Jewish Dog9780983868538

Caleb, a remarkable dog, was born in Germany in 1935. He lived with his loving Jewish family until the Nazis forbade them to have a dog. A Nazi family adopts him and gives him to the SS, where he is trained to be a guard dog at a concentration camp. Caleb performs his duties admirably while acting as a keen observer of history and human nature. He sees the cruelty of the Nazis and the suffering that it caused, but he also witnesses the courage, loyalty, and friendship of the prisoners and those who aided them. He never forgets his original family. Read the rest of this entry »


Judging Book Covers

July 9, 2015

By Shlomo Greenwald

I’ll admit it. I sometimes choose to read a book based on its cover. I know. I know. I’m breaking a cardinal rule of…well…of life, of one that we’ve all been taught, at least as a metaphor, since pre-school.

Whether the rest of us admit it or not, covers draw our attentions and create the initial impressions we have with books. Which is why I’ve long bemoaned the state of book covers in the Orthodox publishing world. There had always been exceptions, but in general the covers were boring and cookie-cutter.

In the last five to 10 years, though, Jewish book covers have gained some vitality and personality. On this page are a few of the new titles whose covers have won
my attention and praise.The Jewish Dog9780983868538

The Jewish Dog by Asher Kravtiz

Designer Shanie Cooper says:

The Jewish Dog is a translation of a novel published in Israel in 2007 to great success. I like the basic design of the original cover and wanted to retain its flavor (a cartoon image of a dog on a solid blue background), but I made several significant changes. I chose a different image for the dog, Caleb, that more closely matched how I imagined him – intelligent and gazing up as if trying to communicate with the reader.

“This was important because this powerful book is uniquely narrated by the dog himself as he lives through the years before, during, and after the Holocaust. I chose a grungy font and added texture to both the font and the blue background to make the cover feel more complex and layered, like the ideas grappled with in the book.

“A further issue affecting this book cover was how to best translate the Hebrew title, Hakelev Hayehudi. The publisher and distributor debated whether a strict translation, although potentially provocative, would be best, or whether to avoid possible controversy by selecting a less derogatory sounding title – for example, The Hebrew Hound, The Yiddish Hound. Also discussed was whether to add a subtitle to the book for clarification, i.e. “A Novel.” In the end, the publisher chose the most accurate translation of the title, simply, The Jewish Dog.”

This originally appeared in The Jewish Press