Was Yosef on the Spectrum? – Interview with Professor Samuel J. Levine

As the parshiyot of Yosef approach, listen to this fascinating interview with Professor Samuel J. Levine, author of Was Yosef on the Spectrum?

Source: https://newbooksnetwork.com/was-yosef-on-the-spectrum

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Was Yosef on the Spectrum? – New Review

Was Yosef on the Spectrum? Understanding Joseph through Torah, Midrash, and Classical Jewish Sources

by Samuel J. Levine

Link to original article: https://doi.org/10.1080/23312521.2022.2142878

The story of Joseph in Genesis 37–50 is both a familiar and confusing narrative to many of us. In this book, Samuel J. Levine, a professor of Law and Director of the Jewish Law Institute at Touro Law Center, posits that Joseph (referred to as Yosef following the Hebrew spelling) may be on the spectrum, i.e. that he might have Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This would provide another way to better understand and appreciate Yosef ’s character, while secondarily providing us with a chance to learn about how we can interact with children and adults on the spectrum.

Continue reading “Was Yosef on the Spectrum? – New Review”

New Review for Jewish Women in Time and Torah

by Rabbi Dov Peretz Elkins

Anyone interested in Jewish law (halakhah) and the status of women in Jewish law, particularly in contemporary times, will find this book refreshing and inspiring. Especially since it was written by an Orthodox rabbi and scholar.

On the final page of the book, we find this revealing, remarkable, inspiring statement:

“Unfortunately, the problem that we are discussing is not limited to the subject of the status of women in Judaism. It is a problem that involves the entire area of present-day religious faith. The so-called drift to the right is a drift towards a naïve, unquestioning spirituality. In essence it is a drift away from authentic Halakhah.”

Jewish Women in Time and Torah – New Review

Will ‘Jewish Women in Time and Torah’ Stimulate Change in the Orthodox World?

By Rabbi Dr. Israel Drazin
Posted on October 19, 2022 on www.sdjewishworld.com

BOCA RATON, Florida — Urim Publications and Ktav Publishing in Jerusalem and New York have just republished Jewish Women in Time and Torah. It focuses on three periods of time in how Judaism treated women: (1) The early period of more than a thousand years until around the beginning of the Common Era when women were treated as creatures somewhere between animals and men, beings far inferior to men, created to serve men. (2) The second period until now when many, but not all rabbis, tried to mitigate the situation and treat women as human beings. (3) Now, where too many rabbis still have the early outlook about women, and much more needs to be done.

Continue reading “Jewish Women in Time and Torah – New Review”

To Be A Holy People – New Review

Modern Ethical Challenges to Judaism Explored in New Book

Rabbi Dr. Benji Levy

Published: The Jerusalem Post – July 9, 2022, 13:22

“The tension between competing values forces most people today into one of three categories: for, against and indifferent. Those in the first two categories often feel burdened by binary choices and respond by burrowing deeper into their positions, limiting themselves to an echo chamber with people they agree with, whether online or in real life. More often than not this leads to a lack of empathy toward people with whom they disagree.

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Interview with Rabbi Ilan Segal – Aruch Hashulchan in English

Watch this great interview by Rabbi Johnny Solomon with Rabbi Ilan Segal about the new Aruch Hashulchan in English.

To Be A Holy People – New Review

Rabbi Dov Peretz Elkins

Eugene Korn has written one of the most inspiring, stimulating, ground-breaking books on Jewish ethics and practice that I have seen in a very long time. Anyone looking for an in-depth study of how inner conscience, personal morality and individual judgment can be applied to traditional halakhah and tradition, will find mounds of evidence in this well-written, well-documented study.

Can Jewish tradition face our modern understanding of justice, equality and human progress? Can mitsvot survive modernity’s deep critique of authority and culture of personal autonomy? To Be a Holy People: Jewish Tradition and Ethical Values addresses ancient and modern moral questions. Building on biblical and rabbinic traditions, it analyzes how Jewish ethics relates to Jewish law, justice, equality and compassion, as well as the challenge of violence in the name of religion. It provides food for thought on subjects ranging from gender, freedom and military ethics to Jewish particularism and contemporary universalism.

Rabbi Dr. Eugene Korn holds a doctorate in moral philosophy from Columbia University and Orthodox rabbinic ordination from Pirchei Shoshanim in Israel. He was founding editor of The Edah Journal. His books include Jewish Theology and World Religions; Plowshares in Swords? Reflections on Religion and Violence; Covenant and Hope; Two Faiths, One Covenant?; and The Jewish Connection to Israel. His English writings have been translated into Hebrew, German, Italian and Spanish. He and his wife, Lila Magnus Korn, live in Jerusalem.