Jews in Medicine

May 6, 2019

Two Loves

Review by Amos Lassen

Dr. Ronald Eisenberg brings two of his great loves, Judaism and Medicie together in “Jews in Medicine” in which he focuses on the contributions made by Jews over time to the medical profession. He shares the history of

More than 450 individual Jewish physicians who he divides by region and area of specialization, “all within a historical context—from Talmudic times to the modern era, from Islamic and Christian lands to the spread of Jewish communities in Europe after the Spanish Inquisition.” There is a large section devoted to the modern era that focuses on European and American physicians and includes Jewish Nobel Prize winners. Included is a description of physicians who were leaders in the Zionist movement and those who contributed to the development of medicine in the State of Israel.

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Touro Law Conference – Was Yosef on the Spectrum

May 3, 2019

Professor Randy Lee ● Widener Law School

Reflections on Jewish and American Disability Law and on the God Who Makes All Things Good

“Professor Sam Levine, Director of the Jewish Law Institute here at Touro, recently published a book, Was Yosef on the Spectrum.  Was Yosef, son of Jacob, son of Rachel, prophet, mystic, favorite of his father, selected savior of the civilized world, master businessman, and Broadway star, on the spectrum?

            When Professor Levine first mentioned that possibility to me and began to explain his reasoning, I felt what I thought were two different responses.  My first response was, “Isn’t that clever!  Isn’t that neat.  Isn’t it creative and lawyerly how Professor Levine has managed to find a way to connect all those events and all those conversations together to support his thesis.” 

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Faith and Freedom Passover Haggadah Event

April 11, 2019

Rahel Berkovits ● Pardes

Faith and Freedom Passover Haggadah presents selections of the writings of Rabbi Eliezer Berkovits, one of the major Jewish philosophers of the twentieth century, as a new and meaningful commentary for the Passover Haggadah. The Seder night experience will be enriched with the reading of the traditional telling of the Exodus along with Rabbi Berkovits’ insightful and refreshing ideas that address crucial topics for the modern era.


Books for Passover

April 3, 2019

New Review – Faith and Freedom

April 2, 2019

Rabbi Nathan Lopes Cardozo ● The Times of Israel

One of the tragedies of Modern Orthodox Judaism is the fact that the thoughts and halachic insights of Rabbi Dr. Eliezer Berkovits (1908-1992) were never sufficiently recognized by the mainstream Orthodox world and its leadership, which often snubbed, attacked, or simply ignored him. By doing so, Orthodoxy and the Jewish people at large did not realize that they paid a heavy price. They overlooked a major figure that could have been their leader and greatly advanced Orthodoxy.

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New Review – Redeeming Relevance in the Book of Leviticus

March 21, 2019

Rabbi Francis Nataf ● The Jewish Press

Redeeming Relevance: Vayikra Avoidance Syndrome and the Torah on One Foot

The Jewish people has a rather peculiar relationship with Vayikra. On the one hand, almost all serious Jews are aware that many of Judaism’s most important laws and ideas are to be found in the Torah’s middle book. On the other hand, Vayikra also contains an overwhelming amount of material that the average reader will find less stimulating. And largely because of that, Jewish culture has created a type of vicious cycle around this book. Because it is more difficult, we tend to look at it less. But because we look at it less, we also understand it less, which – in turn – keeps it difficult and less appealing. In a nutshell, that is what I call Vayikra Avoidance Syndrome.

I just referred to Vayikra as the Torah’s middle book. This was not a casual turn of the phrase – that is the middle book is not a trivial matter. While we often celebrate beginnings and ends, at least two major Jewish institutions show the spiritual weightiness of something’s middle:

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New Review – Berkovits Haggadah

March 20, 2019

Israel Drazin

Hungarian-born scholar Eliezer Berkovits (1908-1992) was a highly respected Orthodox rabbi. He was educated in Berlin, Germany, where he received his PhD. He authored 19 books in several languages.

He held fast to traditional beliefs such as that the Israelites met God at Sinai where God gave them both the Written and the Oral Torahs. He felt that halakha, Jewish law, is necessary to control people from acting against their own and society’s best interest. He explained that during the Holocaust God “hid his face,” hester panim, because God wants humans to use their free will even if they do so in a harmful fashion. He stressed the importance of Zionism. Although he recognized that women are not treated well in matters of marriage and divorce, and believed that both sexes are equal, he did not encourage changes in Jewish law.

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